Ding Dong, the Witch is Dead

February 26, 2014 at 9:04 am 1 comment

Well, it’s all but official that no major tax reform, let alone tax reform putting the credit union tax exemption at risk, will take place this year. Not only is the credit union tax exemption not to be included in draft legislation but no lesser an authority than Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell took tax reform off the table for this year. While this is, of course, good news, given the amount of time and energy that the industry has devoted to the issue over the last several months, the bankers have still scored a partial victory. We’re in a mid-term election year and we have yet to get serious traction on what I consider the single most important issue facing the industry: the need for secondary capital.

Why is secondary capital so important? Let me count the ways. First, it simply makes no sense for credit unions to be penalized while growing in popularity. This is precisely what happens every time a member opens an account in this low interest, moderate growth economy where it is extremely difficult to make money off other people’s money. If credit unions are going to grow then they need the ability every other financial institution has to seek out investors.

Second, any doubt as to the crucial need for secondary capital has been dispelled by the NCUA’s Risk Based Net Worth regulatory reform proposal. In its simplest form, there are two ways a credit union can improve its risk weighting. It can either reduce its assets or increase its capital. But unlike the nation’s largest banks, our largest credit unions don’t have the opportunity to seek out additional capital. In short, if NCUA’s proposal goes forward it will put the brakes on the growth of credit unions whose only sin is to be large.

I understand how divisive the secondary capital debate is within the industry. Credit unions are, at their core, mutual institutions. They have to remain that way if they are going to continue providing members a unique financial experience. But secondary capital reform can be introduced in ways that maintain the essence of the credit union movement, which is one person one vote. If an institution is willing to invest in a credit union it would only do so against the backdrop of restrictions that give it no more or less influence than any other member of a given credit union.

Let’s keep in mind that low income credit unions can already take secondary capital and no one can seriously suggest that these institutions, in the aggregate, do not advance the core missions of the credit union movement.

Tax reform is like one of those Friday the 13th movies. The villain never really dies. The industry must, of course, remain vigilant. But, we don’t want to win the battle and lose the war by letting concerns over the credit union tax exemption crowd out other important pieces of the credit union agenda.

Entry filed under: Advocacy, Political, Regulatory. Tags: , .

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1 Comment Add your own

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Authored By:

Henry Meier, Esq., General Counsel, New York Credit Union Association.

The views Henry expresses are Henry’s alone and do not necessarily reflect the views of the Association.

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