Four Thought on Yesterday’s NCUA Board Meeting

May 1, 2015 at 8:09 am Leave a comment

When I tell people that a good chunk of my professional life is spent reading and responding to regulations, they smile and their eyes glazed over as they try to suppress a yawn. But, believe it or not, an infusion of new members on the NCUA Board means that regulators are really looking to make some meaningful changes. Here are my thoughts on yesterday’s board meeting. All of these regulations and proposals were influenced by industry comments.

Associational Common Bonds Rule

This was the most controversial rule of the day. Responding to concerns that some credit unions were creating sham associations simply for the purpose of increasing membership eligibility, NCUA finalized regulations strengthening its oversight of associational membership requirements. On the bright side, the proposal increases to 12 the types of associational groups that receive automatic pre-approval, including “organizations promoting social interaction or educational initiatives among persons sharing common occupational professions.”

If I wanted to be a glass half-full kind of guy I would say that the final regulation is much improved from the initial draft thanks to industry suggestions. If I wanted to be a glass half-empty kind of guy, I would continue to question why NCUA felt the need to go forward with this regulation in the first place. The only organization that really thought associational membership was being abused was the American Bankers Association.

IOLTA Accounts

When Congress expanded the ability of credit unions to offer Interest-On-Lawyer Trust Accounts (IOLTA) late last year, it also empowered them to offer “similar” escrow accounts. Yesterday, the NCUA proposed regulations defining those similar accounts. Under the proposed rule, they would include accounts for pre-paid funeral expenses, for example. At yesterday’s board meeting, NCUA officials stressed that they are more than willing to consider expanding the types of accounts eligible for insurance coverage under this law. This is one area where a well-written comment letter could clearly benefit the entire industry.

“Technical” Amendments for Corporate Rules

My old boss in the Legislature used to say that there is no such thing as a technical amendment, only amendments that no one understands. I was thinking of this quote yesterday as I heard the board discuss amendments to corporate borrowing authority. These amendments didn’t go as far as the corporates would have liked; however, the final rule improves on the initial proposal by extending to 180 days the maximum term of a corporate’s secured borrowing authority. In listening to the board discuss the proposal, I was struck by how concerned NCUA still is about allowing the corporates to rely too heavily on perpetual capital.

In addition to finalizing this technical amendment, the NCUA proposed an interesting change allowing the corporates to provide bridge loans to credit unions awaiting funding from the Central Liquidity Facility (CLF). When a credit union borrows funds from the facility it can take up to ten days to get the money. Considering that the purpose of the CLF is to provide emergency liquidity for credit unions, this strikes me as a huge defect in the system. NCUA is proposing to allow the corporates to provide members with bridge loans to cover the gap between the request and availability of funds.

I wish the industry would be more concerned with the issue of how best to revitalize the CLF fund. The corporates capitalized the fund with credit unions having access so long as they were a corporate member. When the corporates crashed, so too did their ability to fund the CLF and the industry has been remarkably short-sighted, in my ever-so-humble opinion, when it comes to devising an industry based source of emergency liquidity. At least this is a step in the right direction.

Appraisal Management Companies

NCUA signed off on joint regulations mandated by Dodd-Frank strengthening regulations related to Appraisal Management companies. This regulation is a bit strange, as no one at NCUA seems to know for sure if any credit unions invest in appraisal management CUSOs. This means that even though NCUA approved the rule, it may have absolutely no impact on credit union operations.

On that note, enjoy your weekend.

Entry filed under: Advocacy, Compliance, Regulatory. Tags: , , , .

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Authored By:

Henry Meier, Esq., General Counsel, New York Credit Union Association.

The views Henry expresses are Henry’s alone and do not necessarily reflect the views of the Association.

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