Headed in the Right Direction on FOM Reform

November 20, 2015 at 9:01 am Leave a comment

Yesterday, NCUA unveiled more than a dozen distinct changes to its Field of Membership (FOM) regulations. It will take a few days to figure out the precise impact these changes, some of which are highly technical, will have on credit unions. But, regardless of their ultimate impact, NCUA’s proposal is crucial when viewed in the context of the larger challenges facing the industry.

Let’s face it, credit unions are constrained by a legislative and regulatory framework designed in the early part of the 20th Century. Limiting credit unions to distinct employee groups, distinct communities, and distinct associations made sense in an era where most communities had a manufacturing base and the suburbs had not yet changed the concept of community. Today, the Internet creates world-wide communities and the traditional model of an employee picking up his paycheck on Friday night on his way out of the local mill is obsolete.

Consequently, there is no bigger challenge facing the credit union industry writ large than removing restrictions on who it can serve. Against this backdrop, NCUA deserves credit for taking a fresh look at its existing FOM regulations. But let’s remember that it was only in 2010 that NCUA, under pressure from banker litigation challenging its flexibility when approving community charter expansions, imposed many other restrictions that NCUA is now proposing to tinker with. For example, before 2010, credit unions could provide a “narrative” explaining why a proposed service area constituted a well-defined local community. A 2010 amendment did away with this flexibility, instead mandating that credit unions fit proposed expansions into pre-defined statistical areas.

Yesterday’s proposal doesn’t bring back the narrative option, but by making some of those technical changes I was referring to, it potentially gives credit unions greater flexibility to serve communities, particularly in underserve areas.

Keeping an eye on all of these efforts, of course, is the banking lobby. Its core effort over the last two decades has been to restrain the growth of credit unions by retraining FOM flexibility. The framework that results from this proposal can’t be so flexible as to bear little resemblance to the federal Credit Union Act or result in community charter expansions that can be attacked as arbitrary.

This is why it is so important to view these regulations not as an end in themselves, but as part of a larger effort to educate the public and elected representatives about why charter reform is so important. NCUA deserves credit for this proposal. But the type of changes the industry most needs can only come through legislative action. In the meantime, this is one of those key proposals where substantive feedback, particularly from individual credit unions, is absolutely crucial.

 

Entry filed under: Advocacy, Compliance, General, Regulatory. Tags: , , .

How To Deal With Inactive Accounts NCUA: RBC And Supplemental Capital Are Like Peanut Butter And Jelly

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Trackback this post  |  Subscribe to the comments via RSS Feed


Authored By:

Henry Meier, Esq., General Counsel, New York Credit Union Association.

The views Henry expresses are Henry’s alone and do not necessarily reflect the views of the Association.

Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 436 other followers

Archives