Does your credit union Have WorkPlace Prisoners?

November 10, 2016 at 9:18 am Leave a comment

According to the WSJ  about 8% of employees are “workplace prisoners,” a category described by consultant  Aon Hewitt as people who stay at their jobs despite feeling unmotivated, disengaged and generally negative about their employers . (Full Disclosure-I’ve been saving this for a day when I want  to get as far away from politics and policy as I possibly can).

We all know that every workplace has a certain number of dissatisfied employees and that’s not all together a bad thing. After all,  employees  leaving for greener pastures makes it easier to hire  people who may be a better fit. But prisoners feel trapped.  What intrigues me so much about the this report is that it tried to quantify just how pernicious an influence prisoners can have.  It estimated that your longest serving best paid employees are most likely to be the ones most disengaged and least likely to leave.  Specifically it reports that “Among workers with 26 years or more at their company, 17.1% are prisoners,” In contrast,  your  newest employees are the ones most engaged.

Can you get these employees to improve their attitudes? Maybe, maybe not but what Aon suggests is that you emphasize quantifiable and clear expectations.

One of the reasons we have so many prisoners is because new jobs are hard to come by. According to the US DOL, new  hires edged down to 5.1 million in September  and total separations was little changed at 4.9 million. Within separations, the quits rate was unchanged at 2.1 percent and the layoffs and discharges rate decreased to 1.0 percent.

On that note your faithful blogger is taking a couple of days off but will be back on Tuesday. Enjoy your workday.

Entry filed under: HR. Tags: .

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Authored By:

Henry Meier, Esq., General Counsel, New York Credit Union Association.

The views Henry expresses are Henry’s alone and do not necessarily reflect the views of the Association.

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