Cybersecurity, Escrow, Conversions and Football Highlight a Busy Few Days

January 7, 2020 at 9:19 am 1 comment

DFS Issues Cybersecurity Risk Alert

In a depressing sign of the times, New York’s Department of Financial Services has issued a cybersecurity risk alert informing credit unions that, given the recent assassination of Soleimani and Iran’s demonstrated capabilities and willingness to engage in cyberattacks against financial institutions, “US entities should prepare for the possibility of cyberattacks.”

DFS points out that in 2012 and 2013; Iranian sponsored hackers launched denial of service attacks against US banks. Consequently, it “strongly recommends that all regulated entities heighten their vigilance against cyberattacks.”

Another Credit Union Converts

Hudson Heritage Federal Credit Union has officially announced its conversion to a state charter. Regardless of whether or not a conversion is in your credit union’s plans, it is great to see DFS take the steps to make the state charter a viable option for credit unions, and banks for that matter and credit unions respond positively to these developments. Remember, a viable state charter is in everyone’s interest.

Are You Prepared for Life Without Interest on Your Mortgage Escrow Accounts?

States like New York and California have long had laws mandating that financial institutions pay interest on mortgage escrow accounts, but prior to the Dodd-Frank Act, it was settled law that these state mandates could not be applied to federally chartered institutions. That is changing.

First, let me stress that if you are a federally chartered credit union not currently providing escrow interest, you are currently under no obligation to do so. That being said, however, the signs are mounting that this privilege may not last much longer, and I do think it is worth a bit of your time to start assessing the financial impact that this change will have on your credit union.

Why so glum? As I previously blogged, a lawsuit that came about after Dodd-Frank argued that preemption of escrow accounts no longer applied to federally chartered institutions. As a result, the bank in question was violating the law by refusing to pay interest to the disgruntled plaintiffs. California’s escrow requirement is very similar to New York’s. On Thursday, this lawsuit was settled with Bank of America agreeing to pay $35 million in damages to the plaintiff class, led by Donald Lusnak (subscription to Law360 required). Additionally, it has already started paying mortgage escrow.

This is all happening as a similar lawsuit; Hymes v. Bank of America, is being litigated in New York State Federal Court.

Why Can’t We Use Technology to Figure Out When a Football Crosses the Goal Line?

This is the great question I was pondering this past weekend as I was watching one of the four playoff games, in which the refs were being forced to determine if a running back managed to get the ball over the goal line while maintaining control as he was being assaulted by a group of freakishly fast, oversized athletes. Frankly, if soccer can figure out within less than an inch whether a goal has been scored, and tennis uses similar technology to tell if the ball is in or out, why can’t the NFL do the same?

Just wondering. Enjoy your day.

Entry filed under: Legal Watch, Mortgage Lending, New York State, technology. Tags: , , , , , , , .

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Authored By:

Henry Meier, Esq., Senior Vice President, General Counsel, New York Credit Union Association.

The views Henry expresses are Henry’s alone and do not necessarily reflect the views of the Association. In addition, although Henry strives to give his readers useful and accurate information on a broad range of subjects, many of which involve legal disputes, his views are not a substitute for legal advise from retained counsel.

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