Is the Fed Squeezing Small Lenders Out of Existence?

May 21, 2021 at 12:48 pm Leave a comment

Good Morning, folks.

In the 1930’s the Federal Government responded to the collapse of the farming industry by putting in place a government back framework meant to stabilize the farming industry and stem the impact it was having on everyday Americans. Today, the family farm is largely a relic of a bygone era but the government subsidies designed to keep it alive are still alive and well and disproportionately benefiting larger corporations that don’t need the money.

Many of the same trends are taking hold in the banking industry to the detriment of credit unions.

I’m not going out on much of a limb here to say that you should expect your credit union to have to pay more into the Share Insurance Fund in approximately six months. That’s my takeaway from NCUA’s report on the Share Insurance Fund provided at yesterday’s monthly board meeting. It is also the assessment of one Todd Harper who put credit unions on notice that “absent some unknown external event, these forces seem likely to eventually” push the equity ratio below the 1.20 level at which point NCUA must pass around the Share Insurance Hat.

This unfortunate development isn’t all that surprising. This past week many New York credit unions have had the opportunity to listen to Steve Ricks pithy overview of current credit unions economic trends. Members are stocking away savings at unprecedented levels thanks to all of that government stimulus spending. The bad news is that loan demand isn’t keeping pace and investment returns are non-existent. Put this all together and you have the profits of many credit unions, particularly smaller ones, being squeezed even more than they have been in the past. Perhaps as the economy picks up even more, so will loan demand. We will have to wait and see.

But let’s take a look at the big picture. The trend we are seeing is nothing more than the continuation of forces put in place by the Federal Reserve more than a decade ago. When the mortgage meltdown looked as if it might trigger a depression, even Janet Yellen explained that, while she was empathetic to the difficulties faced by community banks, the economy as a whole benefitted from the stimulus resulting from historically low interest rates.

At the time this argument made sense. But by continuing to take extraordinary steps to suppress interest rates, the Fed’s intervention is feeling more like a permanent lifeline to large banks then a short-term necessity. As someone who believes in the free market this doesn’t feel like a fair competition.

Entry filed under: Economy, econony, Regulatory. Tags: , , .

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Authored By:

Henry Meier, Esq., Senior Vice President, General Counsel, New York Credit Union Association.

The views Henry expresses are Henry’s alone and do not necessarily reflect the views of the Association. In addition, although Henry strives to give his readers useful and accurate information on a broad range of subjects, many of which involve legal disputes, his views are not a substitute for legal advise from retained counsel.

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