SC Rules that New York’s Eviction Moratorium Goes Too Far

August 16, 2021 at 9:19 am Leave a comment

The Supreme Court on Thursday granted emergency relief to landlords challenging a New York State statute barring them from commencing eviction proceedings against tenants who certify that they are suffering a financial hardship as a result of COVID-19. Although the law in question was set to expire on August 31st, the Court’s decision could have important implications if and when the state chooses to take similar steps in the coming weeks or in response to a future economic downturn.

Part A of Chapter 381 of the laws of 2020 provided that individuals could avoid foreclosures by indicating that they were being harmed by the pandemic. A separate section of the bill which the Supreme Court’s decision did not address extended similar protections to homeowners facing foreclosure. In blocking New York State from enforcing this bill against landlords the court technically did not issue a decision on the merits of the case, but by granting the emergency order a majority of the court signaled that New York’s law was illegal. There was even a dissenting opinion.

In a terse explanation of its decision, the majority explained that New York’s statute violated the “longstanding teaching that no man can be a judge in his own case.” In other words, any future law seeking to block evictions has to give landlords the ability to show that a tenant is not suffering from a financial hardship.

Like I said, although this case dealt specifically with evictions, the same argument could easily be made as applied to New York’s foreclosure ban, also set to expire on August 31st, which provides no mechanism for mortgage holders to contest a homeowner’s financial hardship.

                                                Hochul Transition Picks Up Pace

New York’s Superintendent of the Department of Financial Services announced that she would be resigning on August 24th, the same day the Governor has indicated he will hand over power to Lt. Governor Kathy Hochul. Before becoming the Superintendent, Lacewell served as a top aide to the Governor and remained an active advisor.

As for the Governor-in-waiting, she spent Sunday morning appearing on two Sunday news shows demonstrating, yet again, that in politics a week really is a long time. Virtually overnight, she has catapulted from the lowest profile statewide position in New York State government to a nationally significant politician. 

Entry filed under: COVID-19, Legal Watch, Mortgage Lending, New York State, Political. Tags: , , , .

Juneteenth Clarified For Compliance Purposes Another Important Foreclosure Case gives Lenders More Flexibility

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Authored By:

Henry Meier, Esq., Senior Vice President, General Counsel, New York Credit Union Association.

The views Henry expresses are Henry’s alone and do not necessarily reflect the views of the Association. In addition, although Henry strives to give his readers useful and accurate information on a broad range of subjects, many of which involve legal disputes, his views are not a substitute for legal advise from retained counsel.

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