Posts filed under ‘Legal Watch’

You want fries with that Data Breach?

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I have one good thing to say about hackers. They have provided us with fresh evidence of why state and federal lawmakers  need to impose commonsense requirements on merchants and businesses that don’t adequately protect card information from data breaches, and also don’t bother informing consumers of their mistakes.

Three things happened yesterday that are worth telling your congressman and senators about if you are going to be at CUNA’s Governmental Affairs Conference at the end of the month. First, a Pennsylvania federal magistrate has ruled that a class action lawsuit brought by a group of credit unions and CUNA seeking damages in relation to debit and credit cards compromised by a point of sale data breach at Wendy’s franchises can go forward, First Choice Federal Credit Union, et al v.Wendy’s Co., (U.S. Western District PA). The arguments advanced by Wendy’s in this case underscore precisely why we need clear-cut legal standards making merchants responsible for protecting customer data once and for all. Wendy’s alleges that it has no duty to safeguard sensitive customer information or to provide adequate notification of a data breach.

Fortunately the courts are growing increasingly impatient with arguments such as these. But the fact still remains that, without specific laws in place, merchants will continue to deny that they are in any way responsible for the cost related to data breaches.

Also yesterday I was sitting in on CUNA’s weekly regulatory update call.(for the record I realized after the fact that I was THAT GUY, who chats away not realizing his phone was off mute: sorry about that)    During the call, CUNA discussed news of yet another fast food data breach. This one has occurred at Arby’s restaurants. If you are a New York credit union and you think you may have been victimized give me a call as we would like to get a sense of the scope of the possible theft.

Last but not least, it appears that Yahoo’s data breach maybe even worse than reported. When Yahoo finally got around to disclosing that its data had been compromised, it asserted that no debit or credit card information was stolen. A merchant in Texas has recently started a class action lawsuit alleging that his card information was in fact compromised, by the breach of the embattled tech icon.

Yellen’s testimony indicates interest rate rise coming soon

In the first day of her semi- annual testimony before congress Federal Reserve chairwoman Janet Yellen, warned that waiting too long to remove interest rate accommodation would be “unwise.” The likelihood that the Federal Reserve will once again raise interest rates, perhaps as early as March, is more good news for the banks and credit unions that have struggled with narrow profit margins.

On that note, let’s be careful out there and enjoy your day.

February 15, 2017 at 8:54 am Leave a comment

Is it illegal to deny student loans to DACA students?

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Is it a violation of federal law to deny someone a student loan based on their status as a Dreamer? That is the central question posed by a class action lawsuit brought byCalifornia college  students who claim that Wells Fargo denied them student loans in violation of both, Federal and California Law. The lawsuit has the potential of putting financial institutions front- and- center in the debate over the protections the country affords to immigrants.

In June 2012, President Obama’s Department of Homeland Security announced that it would no longer deport young immigrants who had lived in this country for most of their lives, but whose parents were here illegally, and who themselves had never obtained legal status. Under the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA), eligible individuals receive a renewable two year authorization granted by the federal government to stay in the country. Eligible individuals receive a work permit and obtain employment authorization documentation, which entitles them to legally look for work.

The lawsuit was brought by Mitzie Perez, she claims that in August of 2016 she applied for a student loan online. While completing the application she indicated that she was neither a US citizen or a permanent resident. She was immediately denied the loan. Curious as to why she was denied, when she completed the same application a second time, she indicated she was a permanent resident, she was told that “based on the citizenship status you provided, a US Citizen Co-signer will be required for this application”. Should would be able to obtain a co-signer.

She claims the bank violated 42USCA Section 1981. This law provides that “All persons within the jurisdiction of the United States shall have the same right in every State and Territory to make and enforce contracts, to sue, be parties, give evidence, and to the full and equal benefit of all laws and proceedings for the security of persons and property as is enjoyed by white citizens…” She also argues that because of the documentation she is able to provide the bank under DACA, Wells Fargo can provide her a loan without violating the Customer Identification Procedure requirements of the Bank Secrecy Act.

Leaving aside the emotional pull of the argument, the responsibility of financial institutions towards persons who are not permanent legal aliens is ambiguous. Regulation B, which implements the Equal Credit Opportunity Act, makes it illegal to discriminate against an applicant on a prohibited bases, including the applicants’ national origin. Here is where it gets tricky; the commentary accompanying this prohibition explains that while “A creditor may not refuse to grant credit because an applicant comes from a particular country.” A financial institution “may take the applicant’s immigration status into account. A creditor may also take into account any applicable law, regulation, or executive order restricting dealings with citizens (or the government) of a particular country or imposing limitations regarding credit extended for their use.” (12 C.F.R. § Pt. 1002, Supp. I).

Wells Fargo is in a tough spot. On the one hand, I agree with those who argue that there is something distinctly un-American about throwing DACA individuals out of the country. Many of them have spent almost their entire lives growing up as Americans. That being said, the law is the law and just as President Obama extended legal protections with an Executive order in 2012, President Trump could eliminate their legal status with the stroke of a pen. Financial institutions not only have the right but the legal obligation to consider this possibility when deciding whether or not to extend loans to students like Ms. Perez. What decisions they should make based on this information is a much tougher call. This case underscores why congress needs to craft common sense immigration reform.

February 2, 2017 at 9:25 am Leave a comment

Credit Unions TKO bank MBL Litigation

ragingbullOn Tuesday, a Federal District Court in Virginia dismissed a lawsuit brought with much righteous indignation and fanfare by the Independent Bankers Association. (Indep. Cmty. Bankers of Am. v. Nat’l Credit Union Admin., No. 1:16CV1141 (JCC/TCB), 2017 WL 346136, (E.D. Va. Jan. 24, 2017). They worked themselves into a foam-mouthed frenzy following the promulgation of regulations by NCUA, giving credit unions greater flexibility to make MBL loans without first seeking waivers from the agency. Although the case was dismissed on technical grounds, make no mistake about it, if this was a boxing match it would have been a TKO. This was about as complete a victory as the NCUA could have gotten in the first round of what could be extensive litigation ultimately involving not only NCUA’s authority to promulgate changes to its MBL regulations, but also its authority to promulgate changes to field of membership requirements.

In 2003, NCUA amended its regulations. It allowed credit unions to purchase nonmember loan participations without counting such participations against the MBL cap, provided that they get NCUA’s approval to do so. In its 2016 revisions to the MBL rules, NCUA decided that credit unions no longer have to seek prior approval before acquiring nonmember participation interests. The clux of the IBA’s complaint was that credit unions never should have been given the authority with or without NCUA’s approval. The court ruled that the bankers could have brought their complaint more than a decade ago, and their decision not to do so meant that the six year statute of limitations to bring such action had expired long ago.

But wait there is more! In a typical lawsuit it is fairly easy to show that a plaintiff has suffered an injury. For example, if I was hit by a car this morning on my way to work no one would question my right to sue the driver if he was speeding. But in the land of Association litigation standing is a crucial issue. Too broad a view of what constitutes harm makes it easier for Associations like the IBA to sue over credit union laws and regulations. So, I was pleasantly surprised that the judge also concluded that the bankers had not shown that they were in fact harmed by NCUA’s MBL changes. This passage is worth quoting at length because it could be useful in challenging banker’s standings in subsequent lawsuits.

It is not clear at this point that Defendant’s 2016 regulation will result in increased competition against Plaintiff’s member banks. Credit unions were able to compete with banks in the commercial loan arena before the 2016 Rule. Indeed, Plaintiff represents that they have done so vigorously. The 2016 Rule on its face does not permit additional competition. All it does is dispense with the requirement that, after taking on a certain amount of member business loans, a credit union obtain permission to purchase an additional interest in a nonmember business loan.

Finally, the court noted that even if it was to rule on the merits of the case, the bankers would still loose. NCUA did not abuse its discretion in amending its MBL regulations but was instead acting within its authority to interoperate an ambiguous statue.

January 26, 2017 at 9:46 am Leave a comment

Administration Should Trump These Labor Regs

From the National Labor Relations Board’s (NLRB) intrusion into everything from an employer’s rights to regulate employee conduct, to the expansion of non-exempt employees, no area has had a more direct impact on your workplace. And no area may see a more radical shift under the Trump Administration.

Here are some examples:

Concerted Activity: The NLRB arbitrates disputes that involve both union activity and nonunion activity that implicates so called concerted activity. Traditionally this jurisdiction was understood as protecting the rights of nonunionized workers to ban together to address issues of concern in the work place and ultimately not be deterred from forming a union. In contrast, under the Obama Administration’s appointees, concerted activity has been used to regulate everything from punishment of an employee for Facebook postings critical of the boss, to workplace restrictions on sharing salary information. This shift has made your workplace policy manual a tripwire for litigation and made it more difficult to impose common sense restrictions on employee behavior. Let’s hope the NLRB will take a second look at these decisions.

Regulation of Mortgage Originators: For more than a decade now, the courts and the Labor Department have grappled over whether or not mortgage originators are exempt employees. Talk to any veteran of the mortgage industry and they will scoff at the notion that mortgage originators are anything other than exempt employees. After all, if a member calls at 4:55pm wanting to apply for a mortgage loan, no employee in their right mind would tell the applicant to call back tomorrow because their shift is almost over. Nevertheless, the Obama Administration’s Labor Department overruled an interpretation provided by the Bush Administration and opined that in-house mortgage originators are non-exempt employees who must receive overtime. The Supreme Court upheld the right of the Department of Labor to issue this interpretation. The good news is, what the Department of Labor giveth it can taketh away. I hope there will be quick action to reconsider this interpretation so that common sense can once again prevail in the mortgage industry.

Exempt-Employees: The most prominent Labor Department regulation increased the threshold of exempt employees to slightly more than $47,000, and indexed the threshold for inflation. Although it was supposed to take effect late last year, the regulation has been tied up in litigation and it is unlikely to survive the incoming Trump Administration without substantial revisions. Remember that even without the Federal changes, New York State has updated its own exempt-employee regulations

Obligations of Fiduciaries: Last but not least, in April, regulations imposing fiduciary obligations on financial advisors are scheduled to take effect. The outgoing Department of Labor recently issued a memorandum providing questions and answers about the new regulation. This one doesn’t have much of a direct impact on most credit unions. It does, however, on the individuals who provide investment advice to the trustees of your 401(k) plans. By tightening conflict of interest requirements and the fiduciary obligations of outside advisors, there are subtle changes to how your 401(k) plan is overseen. Expect to see changes made to this regulation.

This  extensive to-do list underscores how antiquated our labor laws have become. They were created at a time when a good chunk of the workforce was unionized and it was relatively easy to distinguish the white collar worker in the executive suite from the blue collar worker on the assembly line. The most constructive thing the Trump Administration’s Labor Department can do is advocate for changes to the National Labor Relations Act and the Fair Labor Standards Act  so that classifications such as exempt and non-exempt employees can reflect the modern workplace.

 

January 19, 2017 at 9:22 am Leave a comment

S.C. Frustrated by Lack Of Clarity in New York Law

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Good Morning folks,

I had the opportunity to attend yesterday’s Supreme Court oral arguments in the Expressions Hair Design case. For a lawyer this is kind of the legal equivalent to a trip to Mecca. Although it is impossible to tell from oral arguments what the ultimate outcome of any case will be, it is safe to say that the Supreme Court is not a big fan of New York’s bill drafting technique. Take a look at Section 518 of New York’s General Business Law and see if you share the court’s frustration that the intent of the law is far from clear.

This case involves an argument by merchants who claim that Section 518 violates their First Amendment rights by prohibiting them to explain the true cost of credit to consumers. In contrast, much of the argument was taken up, however,  with a discussion of the statute’s meaning rather than the  underlying constitutional issues. Three of the Justices’, Alito, Sotomayor and Kagan argued that the statute could be interpreted as mandating a single price for all goods. In fact, Justice Alito mused that this might be an “uninformed” interpretation and that he felt uncomfortable about ruling on the constitutionality of this statue without knowing how the New York’s Court of Appeals would interpret it.

The Truth in Lending Act used to use language identical to Section 518 to ban surcharges as a matter of Federal Law. Section 518 was passed by the legislature amid concerns that this national provision was going to expire. At the same time the legislature never defined what a “surcharge” is. In addition, although the attorney general has opined that the law permits merchants to offer cash discounts, this authority is similarly not to be found in the statute’s language.

This lack of clarity led a frustrated Justice Sotomayor to complain to the state “You’re asking me to take a lot of steps, which is start with the language of the statute, ignore it, and go to a Federal statute and apply its definitions. How many of them, you haven’t quite told me. How you differ, you haven’t quite told me. And –but I’m going to assume the Federal definitions apply, even though none of them are used here”. “So I’m –I’m very confused why you’re starting your answer to Justice Breyer by saying, look at the statute and see what the words of the statute are doing.”

Notwithstanding the fact that my powers of prognostication are not as sharp as they used to be-I would have taken Alabama over Clemson and the Giants over the Packers-I am going to guess based on yesterday’s arguments this case will ultimately be sent to the New York Court of Appeals with a request that it interpret the statue on behalf of the Federal Courts.

The funny thing is that Section 518 is by no means unique. In New York bill hearings are non-existent, committees are pro forma get-togethers, and all the real important stuff is done behind closed doors. This is not a system that lends itself to clarity. I have always been amazed it works as well as it does.

January 11, 2017 at 9:39 am Leave a comment

Four things you need to know about New York today

giantI have New York on my mind this morning, and it is not just because I am suffering from post-traumatic stress disorder after watching the second half of the yesterday’s Packers-Giants game. Is the second half over yet?

Instead, I am thinking about New York because there is a lot going on both regulatory and legislatively that financial institutions should be keeping an eye on.

Time to fill out your exemption claim forms

Once again, with a huge assist from Joan Lannon, in the Associations, compliance department, here is a link to the form that your credit union will to claim an exemption from the requirement to maintain abandon property. Remember you have until February 28, 2017 to apply for the exemption, but it makes no sense to wait.

Elder Abuse Legislation to be a top priority for Cuomo

Today marks the unofficial start of the 2016-2017 legislative sessions. This year the governor is foregoing the tradition of speaking before a joint legislative session in Albany. Instead, he is unveiling his State of the State priorities in regional speeches, the first of which is today. On Friday, he announced he would be proposing comprehensive elder abuse legislation.  The specifics have yet to be released, but according to the press release, the governor’s plan would include an Elder Abuse certification program for banks as well as measures to empower banks to place holds on “potentially fraudulent transactions”. Incidentally, I don’t know if the exclusive reference in the press release to banks is an oversight or an indication that credit unions won’t be covered by these measures. I strongly suspect that it is the former.

Rocky start to Legislative Session

A hallmark of the Cuomo administration has been an end to New York’s dysfunctional budget process; most importantly every budget proposed by the governor has been enacted pretty much on time. This run will be put to a test this year. As these legislative preview articles indicate, both the governor and legislature are angry at the lack of progress in negations held late last year and there isn’t quite as much money to spend as there used to be. This could be a very interesting session.

Expressions Hair Design to be argued tomorrow

Expressions Hair Design v. Schneiderman, a case challenging New York’s ban on credit card surcharges above an items headline price, is to be argued before the Supreme Court tomorrow. Both CUNA and NYCUA wrote amicus briefs in support of New York’s law. There will be no blog tomorrow, as yours truly and Michael Lieberman will be headed to D.C to watch the arguments first hand.

As for all you depressed Giant fans, remember, we still have the Knicks. WOW it’s going to be a long winter. Maybe I will start getting ready for fantasy baseball.

January 9, 2017 at 8:45 am Leave a comment

News Flash: FinCen Can’t Legalize Pot Banking

The effort to legalize marijuana on the federal level received a high level push in December when Massachusetts Senator Elizabeth Warren joined a group of senators in a letter to FinCEN. Her celebrity status has triggered another round of  media coverage;  After all, she is already being mentioned as a potential nominee for president with the next election only four years away and she likes to tweet which is  a core prerequisite for the office.

By joining the most recent letter writing campaign she has once again put the spotlight on the Alice in Wonderland world of legalized pot. It makes perfect sense for the senator to join the push for legalizing cannabis. In November, Massachusetts voters approved a referendum to legalize marijuana for recreational purposes. There are now 29 states, including New York, which legalize the possession of marijuana to some extent.

What drives me nuts is that Warren and her fellow senators once again chose to badger FinCEN to approve additional guidance clarifying that banks and credit unions can provide banking services to pot businesses in states in which they are legal. To be clear, I believe that the federal government should legalize the sale and distribution of marijuana in those states where it is legal. I also believe that banks and credit unions should be able to provide services to these legitimate businesses. The senators correctly point out that even though FinCEN issued a 2014 guidance detailing the conditions under which it would allow them to do so fewer than three percent of the nation’s banks and credit unions are willing to serve this industry.

However at the risk of being accused of banging my head against the wall, the way to get this accomplished is not to require more guidance from FinCEN. Federal law and regulation makes pot illegal and there is nothing that FinCEN can do to change that. it is not the DEA. Furthermore even if FinCEN could entice banks and credit unions to more actively engage in servicing this industry the reality is that the continued legal cloud over the industry raises a host of issues, over which FinCEN has no control,. These issues range from the enforceability of contracts to the legality of bankruptcy cases involving marijuana businesses.

It is time for all interested parties to confront the real issues once and for all.

January 5, 2017 at 10:00 am 3 comments

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Authored By:

Henry Meier, Esq., General Counsel, New York Credit Union Association.

The views Henry expresses are Henry’s alone and do not necessarily reflect the views of the Association.

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